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Instrustions for FUNGI Magazine Authors

FUNGI publishes artwork, photography, original research papers, and review articles on all aspects of fungi, including lichens and slime molds. Articles with color photographs; illustrations; keys to genera, species, families, etc.; and notes of interest on rare and unusual fungi are especially welcome. Articles should be knowledgeable and well illustrated and aimed at an informed but not necessarily specialist readership. There are no length requirements. There are no page charges to publish in FUNGI. All technical papers and reports will be peer-reviewed to ensure quality. Following acceptance, authors of technical papers can expect a rapid time to publication; all technical papers and any supplemental information will be published online at the Magazine’s website. Published content of FUNGI is under copyright and permission for reproduction must be obtained by application in writing to the Publisher. NOTE: The Editors reserve the right to edit manuscripts for clarity of expression and to conform to journal style and the limits of the space available; permission to do so will first be obtained from all corresponding authors of manuscripts.

Submission of manuscripts
Submit manuscripts to the Publisher as Microsoft Word document files as an email attachment. Alternately, we welcome copies sent on diskette or CD-ROM. Whichever method, it may be helpful to send a printed hard copy, especially if tables, figures, or images are to be used. All manuscripts will be reviewed by the Publisher and at least one Editor. The Publisher will make the final decision on acceptance. It is strongly recommended that you have your manuscript reviewed by a reputable authority before you submit it for publication; this will be to your benefit in the long run!

Send manuscripts to:
Britt A. Bunyard, PhD
Editor-in-Chief, FUNGI
fungimag@gmail.com

P.O. Box 780
Moorpark, CA 93020 USA
 
While the rules for publishing in FUNGI are not overly rigorous, the Editors will strive for high quality articles of a consistent format. To that end, here are a few guidelines to follow:

  • All text must be left-aligned so that the right margin is uneven (not justified).
  • Paragraph indents should be consistent throughout the file. Use the tab key or paragraph indent, not multiple spaces.
  • Authors are urged to have one or more colleagues read and criticize the manuscript prior to submitting it.
  • Manuscripts requiring extensive alterations by the Publisher will be returned to the author for correction of the computer file. Authors should follow the suggestions in the Chicago Manual of Style (14th or 15th edition preferred).

Title page The first page should include a reasonably short title, the author(s) name(s), full postal address(es) and postal code(s), and, if available, email address.
 
Abstract Technical papers and reports should start with a brief abstract (of up to 200 words as a single paragraph) that is followed by key words so that the gist of the report can appear in the abstracting periodicals that list FUNGI. The abstract must stand alone and be informative without the need for reference to the text.

Key Words Each technical paper should be accompanied by a listing of several key words as an aid to abstracting journals and retrieval. Key words should supplement the title and not duplicate title words. Insert the key words in alphabetical order immediately after the abstract on a separate indented line.

Scientific names of genera and species must be in italics (e.g. Agaricus bisporus). Vernacular names (e.g. an ascomycete, both gasteromycetes, the agarics, several tremellas, etc.) should not start with a capital letter.
 
Tables should have a caption and be submitted on a separate sheet (and clearly labeled). Tables should be numbered consecutively as Table 1, Table 2, etc. All tables must be referred to in the text in the order presented.

Figures may be line illustrations (figures, charts, graphs and drawings) or photographs (black-and-white or color) and should be referred to consecutively in the text in the order presented. Illustrations and photographs may be submitted as hard copy to be scanned or on a diskette / CD-ROM (line drawings or black and white photographs @ 1000 dpi; color photographs @ 300 dpi or higher for good resolution) with back-up hard copy. Each figure must be supplied on a separate sheet with a label (may be on reverse side) clearly identifying the author’s name and figure number. Figure legends must be self-explanatory and typed on a separate sheet. Line drawings should be designed to fit the page (approx. 8.5” X 11”). Photographs must be clear and of good quality, clearly labeled and numbered as for line drawings. For microscopic features, scale should be provided.
 
Literature Cited Citations in the text should use the author-date style and must include the full title of the paper and its source (journal title - unabbreviated; book – including author(s)/editor(s), publisher; etc.). See other mycological journals (e.g. McIlvainea, Mycologia, Mycological Research, Field Mycology, Mycotaxon, or previous issues of FUNGI) for generally acceptable styles. See below examples for specific styles. All references must be cited in the text, and all references in the text should appear in the list of references. The corresponding author is responsible for the accuracy of references.

Examples of citation in the text:

Johnsen (1833) said …

Species are ubiquists (Johnsen, 1830; Johnsen and Brown, 1833; Johnsen et al., 1835) …

Examples of references:

Johnsen, H. 1833. Species are ubiquists. Journal of Ubiquism 5: 35-400.

Johnsen, H., and D. Brown. 1833. Toadstools in forests. Journal of Mushrooms 6(2): 1-5.

Johnsen, H., M. Smith, and D. Brown. 1833. Lawn toadstools. Journal of Mushrooms 6(3): 10-25.

Johnsen, H. 1833. On the Ubiquism of Species. London, Paris: Longman & Co. 535 pp.

Johnsen, H. 1833. Species as ubiquists. In: D. Brown, Ed., Toadstools of Britain, pp. 545-567. London, Paris: Longman & Co.

Keys must be dichotomous, and the couplets numbered. Different styles are permitted, but authors are strongly urged to use the indented key format as shown below (from Vellinga, 2004).

1. Spore print green; lamellae completely greenish with age.......................................................................................................................... Chl. molybdites
1. Spore print white or off-white; lamellae whitish or brownish with age, never totally green; sometimes a bluish green shade is present near the stipe

2. Pileus squames of similar color as background, either completely greyish or olivaceous brown or predominantly white to cream

3. Pileus olivaceous brown, greyish brown; basidia 4-spored; spores with germ pore; cheilocystidia clavate; known from the Pacific Northwest... Chl. olivieri
3. Pileus white with yellow scales; basidia 2-spored; spores without germ pore; cheilocystidia cylindrical; known from the southeastern states, Illinois and Hawai’i ............................................................................ ............................................................................................................................ Chl. hortense

2. Pileus squames brown (different shades) on white to cream background, which is distinctly paler than squames (though may become concolorous with age)

4. Clamp-connections absent at base of basidia and cheilocystidia; cheilocystidia 19-53 x 8.5-20 µm, very variable in shape, often clavate, some with moniliform apical excrescence; known from Florida................................................................................................................................... Chl. subrhacodes
4. Clamp-connections present at base of basidia and cheilocystidia

5. Basidiocarps with abruptly to marginately bulbous stipe base; annulus relatively simple, without a double crown, but with a tough brown patch on the underside; spores often with a truncate apex; cheilocystidia 20-51 x 9-19 µm, clavate, narrowly clavate......................................................... Chl. brunneum
5. Basidiocarps with widened base of stipe, but not abruptly so; annulus complex, with double crown; spores either with truncate or with rounded apex; cheilocystidia 10-38 x 8.5-25 µm long, spheropedunculate, broadly clavate to clavate..................................................................................... Chl. rachodes

   

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